Safe & Secure Kamloops

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The City of Kamloops recognizes the importance of a safe and secure community. Community safety requires involvement from community and government agencies, business organizations, residents, municipal staff, and City Council.

The new and more inclusive structure for the Safe and Secure Working Group—known as Safe & Secure Kamloops—provides the opportunity for broader community representation, targeted and focused discussions, and increased opportunities for partnership and collaboration.

Safe & Secure Kamloops will be supported by four engagement groups—Protective and Safety Services, Business Sector, Social Agencies, and Neighbourhood Associations—which will include City staff and representatives from community groups, government agencies, Indigenous organizations, social service providers, business organizations, and neighbourhood associations. This structure will focus beyond street-level social issues to also encompass safety and security through a broader community lens.

The City of Kamloops recognizes the importance of a safe and secure community. Community safety requires involvement from community and government agencies, business organizations, residents, municipal staff, and City Council.

The new and more inclusive structure for the Safe and Secure Working Group—known as Safe & Secure Kamloops—provides the opportunity for broader community representation, targeted and focused discussions, and increased opportunities for partnership and collaboration.

Safe & Secure Kamloops will be supported by four engagement groups—Protective and Safety Services, Business Sector, Social Agencies, and Neighbourhood Associations—which will include City staff and representatives from community groups, government agencies, Indigenous organizations, social service providers, business organizations, and neighbourhood associations. This structure will focus beyond street-level social issues to also encompass safety and security through a broader community lens.

  • Connecting With Community Services

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    April 20, 2022 — When it comes to connecting with Community Services Division, the good news is, there are many options available.

    Community Services works 24 hours, 7 days a week, to promote compliance with the City's bylaws, regulations, and programs. These services are primarily accomplished through public relations, education, awareness programs, and when required, enforcement.

    Residents who have bylaw or community concerns in their neighbourhood are encouraged to report the issue to the City. If you are unsure if the issue experienced is a bylaw infraction or community-related concern, please call 250-828-3409, and a customer service centre representative will help direct your call to the appropriate department.

    Online reporting is a great time-saving tool for contacting Community Services about minor property offences or bylaw infractions. Submitting a report will initiate an investigation by a Community Services Officer and open a file.

    Common examples of activities or issues that are regulated by City bylaws include:

    • property conditions
    • graffiti
    • dogs
    • backyard chickens
    • excessive noise
    • illegal suites
    • parking infractions
    • signs (unauthorized placement/construction)
    • business licensing
    • zoning (property use)
    • building (construction, electrical, and plumbing safety)
    • obstructions on streets or sidewalks
    • witnessed disposal of litter on public space with suspect information
    • use of parks and other public spaces
    • protection of significant trees
    • social issues

    Ways to Report a Bylaw Violation

    • Online reporting: Kamloops.ca/BylawReport
    • Non-emergency: 250-828-3409
    • Send a letter outlining your concerns to: Community Services, City of Kamloops, 1303 Mission Flats Road, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A9

    Before a Community Services Officer can act on a complaint, the reporter’s name, address, and phone number is required to allow for an officer to follow up on the report.

    An index of most accessed bylaws, including Good Neighbour Bylaw No. 49-1, which promotes civic responsibility and encourages good relationships between neighbours, can be found on Kamloops.ca/Bylaws.

  • Sharps Recovery and Peer Program is More than a Harm Reduction Initiative

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    April 19, 2022—In 2020, through funding from the Community Action Initiative Community Wellness and Harm Reduction Grant, the City of Kamloops, with support from the ASK Wellness Society, piloted the Sharps Recovery and Peer Program—the first of its kind in our community. This program's social value stretches far beyond public safety. Read the full story.

  • Statement from the Mayor - Addressing Social Issues in Kamloops

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    Addressing Social Issues in Kamloops - We Will Not Give Up

    March 28, 2022—This past weekend highlighted many social issues in our community that I want to address and discuss. Over the weekend, the downtown McDonalds announced its closure for many reasons, including open drug use and safety concerns; there was an overdose in the public washroom of a popular department store; and there were likely many other instances throughout our community that were not as public.

    While this happened here, in our home, unfortunately these things are occurring throughout the province and across the country. The drug supply in BC is toxic, and Kamloops is no exception. Sadly, persons addicted to drugs are dying at an alarming rate, and last month, Kamloops had the third highest number in the province.

    Drug addiction, poverty, and mental illness are health issues, not criminal issues. Council and I are working together with the City on many fronts to assist, including the following:

    • supporting additional Car 40 units
    • calling for a sobering centre
    • constantly lobbying for more detox and recovery beds for youth and adults
    • working with the school district on anti-gang and anti-drug messaging for students
    • conducting research with TRU through the Researcher-in-Residence program on street issues
    • authorizing an increase in the strength of our local RCMP detachment
    • working extensively with the Chamber of Commerce and initiating an anti-tagging and graffiti program
    • constantly liaising with the North Shore Business Improvement Association and the Downtown Business Improvement Association
    • adding 20 new Community Service Officers and expanded their program to 24/7 coverage of the streets
    • working on situation tables to discuss individual clients and treatment plans for them with care providers
    • expanding the Safe and Secure Kamloops Committee into a larger, more inclusive structure to support a safe and secure community with four engagement groups (protective and safety services, social agencies, neighbourhood associations, and business sector)
    • working closely with and supporting the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), ASK Wellness, The Mustard Seed, and other shelter and social housing providers
    • lobbying hard for a complex care facility in Kamloops
    • meeting with our MP and asking for Criminal Code changes
    • lobbying the Crown Prosecutors Office for changes to the charge assessment standards
    • supporting CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) talks with neighbourhood associations and with business
    • working regularly with BC Housing to get more supportive and subsidized housing opportunities for those local residents that are street affected
    • working at the federal level with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, working at the local level with the Southern Interior Local Government Association (neighbouring municipalities)
    • raising concerns with the Union of BC Municipalities
    • meeting almost weekly with Interior Health and in particular with their mental health and addictions unit to explore new treatment centre options and care models
    • working with Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc to support the work they are doing on behalf of Indigenous persons in crisis
    • leading community cleanups of our riverbanks
    • administering funding to support the Envision shuttle, which provides outreach and transportation to shelters for people experiencing homelessness (operated by CMHA)
    • administering funding and providing a location to support a day space for people experiencing homelessness at 48 Victoria Street West (April 1 to October 31)—a joint collaboration between Indigenous and non-Indigenous service providers
    • establishing good neighbour agreements with shelter and supportive housing operators with commitments to site management, risk mitigation, and compliance with the Good Neighbour Bylaw
    • funding security services and patrols in commercial corridors and centres to help support a sense of safety for businesses and residents
    • administering funding to support a sharps pickup program that provides employment to people with a lived experience of homelessness and/or substance use—operated by CMHA, ASK Wellness, and The Mustard Seed
    • serving on the provincial decriminalization table and supporting the Province’s efforts around decriminalization
    • continuing to administer federal Reaching Home funds aiming to prevent, reduce, and end homelessness
    • continuing to administer Social and Community Development Grants to address social issues in the community
    • working with Interior Health to enact heat alert response plans and make facilities available for community during extreme heat events
    • working with BC Housing and local service providers to offer shelter and relief for vulnerable people during extreme weather events (heat, cold, and air quality)
    • developing a shelter land use analysis that uses criteria linked to social and community planning principles to help identify areas that may be suitable for future shelter sites
    • establishing a memorandum of understanding to support a collaborative approach between the City and BC Housing with regard the planning, development, operations, and communications for future shelter, supportive housing, and affordable rental housing sites
    • In addition, I support both the decriminalization of personal possession and the provision of a safe supply, and I am working weekly with the BC Urban Mayor’s Caucus; yet sadly, conditions continue to deteriorate.


    We will not give up.
    The things we are experiencing are new to Kamloops and are unsettling, but they are evident throughout BC, and we will continue to work with all of our partner agencies to curb what is a complex combination of drug addiction, chronic untreated mental illness, and acquired brain injury. We are always open to trying new ideas, and I would invite you to assist us in that regard should there be other approaches we may have missed.

    -Mayor Ken Christian

  • Combating Graffiti in our Community

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    March 9, 2022— Warm weather on the horizon doesn’t only indicate that spring is near, it’s a sign that the Graffiti Task Force (GTF) resumes work within the community. Annually, weather permitting, the GTF, a non-profit society, works diligently by removing unsightly graffiti from public property as part of a partnership program with the City of Kamloops.

    The City initiated the original task force, which later became its own non-profit society in 2006. Currently, Community Service Officers work closely with the GTF to address graffiti reports and to begin the removal process. The additional support from officers help to identify vandalism and works with the Society to remove graffiti from public property such as bridges, utility boxes, lamp standards, public washrooms, street signage, etc.

    Read more....

  • City Council Authorizes Day Space for People Experiencing Homelessness

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    January 25, 2022—City Council authorized the City to enter into a short-term facility use permit with the Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society and The Mustard Seed to provide a day space at 48 Victoria Street West for people experiencing homelessness from April 1 to October 31, 2022.

    The Gathering Place is a collaboration between Indigenous and non-Indigenous service providers and an opportunity to provide a culturally safe space for people experiencing homelessness to access supports during daytime hours. The two service providers have been approved for funding through Reaching Home: Canada’s Homelessness Strategy, a federal program aimed at preventing and reducing homelessness, to operate The Gathering Place in 2022 and 2023.

    The Gathering Place fills an identified need for a day space on the South Shore. The space will be open 12:00–8:00 pm, seven days a week, and will be maintained and cleaned upon closure on a nightly basis. The first day of operations at the day space will follow the closure of the temporary winter shelter at the Stuart Wood gymnasium on March 31, 2022.

    In 2021, the two service providers operated The Gathering Place at 48 Victoria Street West from August 16 to November 5. During this time, there were 2,792 unique site visits and 642 meals served. The service providers plan to improve and expand the services on site in 2022 with increased activities, advocacy and navigation services, Indigenous culturally programming and traditional meals, and client involvement in supporting site management.

    The 2021 Reaching Home Point-in-Time Count conducted on April 15 and 16, 2021, identified 206 individuals as experiencing homelessness in the city. Nearly 50% of respondents self-identified as Indigenous, which is a significant over-representation as Indigenous people comprise approximately 10% of Kamloops residents according to Census data. Of clients who attended The Gathering Place in 2021, 44% identified as Indigenous.

Page last updated: 21 Apr 2022, 11:35 AM