Curbside Organic Waste Collection

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Current status
The project shifts into Phase 2 - Pilot Program - in September 2021. View a map of the pilot routes below. Downloadable maps for each pilot route are also available in the Document Library on this page.

Background
In December 2020, Council authorized staff to move ahead with a three-phased approach to developing a residential organics collection program. An organic waste collection program will help residents divert more waste from the landfill, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and return organic material to the soil ecosystem. Did you know? Organic waste makes up approximately 38% of all residential waste that ends up at our landfill? This material utilizes valuable landfill space and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions (primarily methane) in our community.


Organic Waste
What is organic waste? Organic waste can broadly be thought of as anything that used to be alive. It refers primarily to food waste and food-soiled paper and can also include household plants/flowers and some yard waste. Kitchen food scraps include cooked food (leftovers) or unused or spoiled grains, dairy, produce, and meat. Bones, egg/seafood shells, and small amounts of fat, grease, and oils are also organic waste. Food-soiled paper products are often compostable and are suitable for organic waste collection. These include paper napkins, paper towel, food-soiled newsprint, pizza boxes, coffee grinds/filters and tea bags, as well as wooden chopsticks, popsicle sticks, and skewers. Read our FAQs for a developing list of what can and can not be included in a 'green' bin.

Collection
With the program, residential residents will each receive two bins—a small kitchen bin (approximately 1 cu. ft. in size) and a curbside cart. The kitchen bin would typically be stored on a counter next to a sink, or underneath the sink. It may be lined with newsprint for ease of emptying and cleanliness, and has a lid that snaps shut to help eliminate any odour and fruit flies. When the kitchen bin is full, the food waste is transferred to the curbside cart, which can be stored alongside your garbage and recycling carts. The size of the curbside cart and the frequency of collection are yet to be determined. We will learn more as we conduct research, hear from residents and conduct a pilot program.

Why Now?

A curbside organic waste collection program is estimated to reduce the community’s carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 2,800 tonnes per year (equivalent to removing about 600 passenger vehicles) and save the City $1 million annually in costs related to landfill capacity. Outcomes of organic waste collection in Kamloops also align with waste reduction goals outlined in the City’s Official Community Plan–KAMPLAN–and the Thompson-Nicola Regional District’s Solid Waste Management Plan, which aim to reduce waste to the landfill to 560 kg/person annually by 2023 (in 2019, the disposal rate was 750 kg/person annually). Recent (fall 2020) public engagement for the Community Climate Action Plan showed organic waste collection as one of the top three policy changes supported by residents.


Funding opportunities for Canadian municipalities to implement curbside organic waste collection programs have also expanded in recent years, and City staff have identified grant opportunities through the Green Municipal Fund and CleanBC to support the funding for this project.

Current status
The project shifts into Phase 2 - Pilot Program - in September 2021. View a map of the pilot routes below. Downloadable maps for each pilot route are also available in the Document Library on this page.

Background
In December 2020, Council authorized staff to move ahead with a three-phased approach to developing a residential organics collection program. An organic waste collection program will help residents divert more waste from the landfill, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and return organic material to the soil ecosystem. Did you know? Organic waste makes up approximately 38% of all residential waste that ends up at our landfill? This material utilizes valuable landfill space and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions (primarily methane) in our community.


Organic Waste
What is organic waste? Organic waste can broadly be thought of as anything that used to be alive. It refers primarily to food waste and food-soiled paper and can also include household plants/flowers and some yard waste. Kitchen food scraps include cooked food (leftovers) or unused or spoiled grains, dairy, produce, and meat. Bones, egg/seafood shells, and small amounts of fat, grease, and oils are also organic waste. Food-soiled paper products are often compostable and are suitable for organic waste collection. These include paper napkins, paper towel, food-soiled newsprint, pizza boxes, coffee grinds/filters and tea bags, as well as wooden chopsticks, popsicle sticks, and skewers. Read our FAQs for a developing list of what can and can not be included in a 'green' bin.

Collection
With the program, residential residents will each receive two bins—a small kitchen bin (approximately 1 cu. ft. in size) and a curbside cart. The kitchen bin would typically be stored on a counter next to a sink, or underneath the sink. It may be lined with newsprint for ease of emptying and cleanliness, and has a lid that snaps shut to help eliminate any odour and fruit flies. When the kitchen bin is full, the food waste is transferred to the curbside cart, which can be stored alongside your garbage and recycling carts. The size of the curbside cart and the frequency of collection are yet to be determined. We will learn more as we conduct research, hear from residents and conduct a pilot program.

Why Now?

A curbside organic waste collection program is estimated to reduce the community’s carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 2,800 tonnes per year (equivalent to removing about 600 passenger vehicles) and save the City $1 million annually in costs related to landfill capacity. Outcomes of organic waste collection in Kamloops also align with waste reduction goals outlined in the City’s Official Community Plan–KAMPLAN–and the Thompson-Nicola Regional District’s Solid Waste Management Plan, which aim to reduce waste to the landfill to 560 kg/person annually by 2023 (in 2019, the disposal rate was 750 kg/person annually). Recent (fall 2020) public engagement for the Community Climate Action Plan showed organic waste collection as one of the top three policy changes supported by residents.


Funding opportunities for Canadian municipalities to implement curbside organic waste collection programs have also expanded in recent years, and City staff have identified grant opportunities through the Green Municipal Fund and CleanBC to support the funding for this project.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded. Please subscribe to receive project updates on this page to stay up-to-date on future public engagement opportunities.
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Do you support a curbside residential organic waste collection program in Kamloops?

Yes
84%
No
11%
Unsure—I'm open to it, but I need to know more first.
5%
Total Votes : 1555