Budget Consultation 2020

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The City would like to consult and engage with residents about the 2020 budget, as it plans for its next five-year budget cycle, from 2020 to 2024.

We are currently at the end of the public consultation portion of the life cycle (see the full life cycle on this page).

There are many factors that affect the City's operating budget, and City staff continually balance necessary costs and priorities while maintaining the service levels that our community expects. City directors and managers are always looking for efficiencies that can result in cost savings. Activities are also tied to priorities

The City would like to consult and engage with residents about the 2020 budget, as it plans for its next five-year budget cycle, from 2020 to 2024.

We are currently at the end of the public consultation portion of the life cycle (see the full life cycle on this page).

There are many factors that affect the City's operating budget, and City staff continually balance necessary costs and priorities while maintaining the service levels that our community expects. City directors and managers are always looking for efficiencies that can result in cost savings. Activities are also tied to priorities set out by Council in the Council Strategic Plan.

On this page, learn more about key budget timelines and processes, view documents, infographics, videos, and ask questions of the City's finance managers.

For historical budget documents, including the City's financial statements, visit the City's budget website.

Click here for historical information on last year's 2019 Budget Consultation.

Consultation has concluded
  • Tax Rates Set; Homeowners Encouraged To Pay Taxes On Time If They Can

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    3 months ago

    April 29, 2020

    Tax Rates Set

    On Tuesday, April 28, Council set the property tax mill rates for each class. Setting the mill rates for each class is the last step in the annual budgeting process and allows the City to collect property taxes. The tax mill rate for Class 1, Residential, is $4.74 per $1,000 of assessed value.

    Based on the revised budget items approved by Council on April 21, the property tax requirement for 2020 is $114.6 million, a 2.29% increase over 2019 (the initial provisional increase before the impact of the pandemic was 2.97%).

    “The rate translates into an approximate $55 increase for the average representative house in Kamloops, although it is important to note that the actual increase or decrease in the amount of property taxes paid by each household reflects the increase in the City’s budget as well as how your property value changed in relation to other properties in the City,” said Kathy Humphrey, the City’s Corporate Services Director.

    Video: Your Property Value Change and Property Taxes

    Homeowners Encouraged To Pay Property Taxes On Time If They Can

    The City recognizes the concerns and financial impacts that the COVID-19 pandemic has on individuals and homeowners. July 2, 2020, will remain the deadline to pay property taxes, and a 10% penalty is typically levied on outstanding taxes the following day (July 3).

    However, to provide flexibility for homeowners (Classes 1,2,3 and 9) this year, Council approved extending the penalty window and splitting the penalty between two dates, as follows:

    • payment by July 2 deadline – no penalty
    • payment between July 3 and July 30 – no penalty
    • payment between July 31 and September 30 – 5% penalty
    • payment after October 1 – 10% penalty


    Homeowners should still apply for their Home Owner Grants on time to ensure that this reduction is reflected on their accounts.

    Earlier this month, the Province announced October 1, 2020, as the date for the application of the 10% penalty for property Classes 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.

    Although a grace period is in place, the City strongly encourages all homeowners and businesses that can pay their taxes on time do so. The City relies on property taxes and utilities revenue as the main source of revenue for the year, and the timing of receipt from taxes directly impacts the City’s cash flow.

    “As a property owner, if you are able to pay your taxes on the due date of July 2, please do. This revenue helps the City to keep operating and providing vital services that the public relies on, especially in times like these,” explained Humphrey. “We have put contingency measures in place, but we are asking all citizens who can to please pay their taxes by July 2, if at all possible.”

    For those 55+, families with children, widows and widowers, and people with disabilities, the Province already has a program available to defer property taxes. This option is a low-interest loan against the principal residence.

    The City would like to remind homeowners that the total amount payable on property tax bills does not just reflect the homeowner’s property taxes. It also reflects taxes collected on behalf of external authorities, such as the Thompson-Nicola Regional District, the hospital, and the school district. Taxes for these external authorities are not set by the City and are due to the external bodies by an assigned deadline.

    Infographic: Understanding Your Taxes and Where They Go

    “The City needs property taxes to make these payments so that the City doesn’t go into debt and to support these other entities, which rely on the collection of this funding to continue their operations,” said Humphrey.


  • Budget Impact Report

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    4 months ago

    April 22, 2020 - Budget Impact Report

    Kathy Humphrey, the City's Corporate Services Director, presented a report to address several new issues related to the approval of the 2020–2024 Five-Year Financial Plan that have arisen since the provisional budget was approved in December 2019.

    View the report here.

    The provisional budget planned for an increase of $3 million after growth (2.97%). With the anticipated changes in revenue expectations due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 budget is showing a revenue shortfall in the range of $7–12 million.

    The report and the recommendations addressed two key issues—protecting the City’s cash flow security and supporting the community’s residents and businesses during this difficult economic time. In order to balance the budget and reduce the tax increase, the following considerations were made by Administration:

    • deferring many of the new tax-funded items that were initially approved as part of the 2020 provisional budget and supplemental items
    • reducing various operating line items that will not be required in 2020 due to the restrictions in place as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic
    • deferring capital funding and capital projects that are not urgent or cannot be completed in 2020, including tax-funded and grant-funded (Gaming, Community Works, etc.) activities
    • using reserves to fund operations and other capital projects as needed or as assumptions change


    Council authorized Administration to remove the following tax funded items from the 2020–2024 Five‑Year Financial Plan to reduce the overall tax increase for 2020:

    • Asset Management Reserve increase ($550,000)
    • one of two new RCMP municipal employee full-time equivalent (FTE) positions ($42,750)
    • new Arborist FTE position ($47,250)
    • transit expansion for September 2020 ($82,000 in 2020, $258,000 in 2021, $270,000 in 2022, and $161,000 in 2023)
    • new service agreement funding ($33,000)


    With the removal of these items, the tax rate increase for 2020 is estimated to be 2.29%.

    Council authorized Administration to prepare a revised 2020–2024 Five‑Year Financial Plan for Council’s consideration that reflects the assumptions that the COVID-19 pandemic will impact the City’s operations through September 2020 (Scenario 2). Council provided direction to reduce the operating expenditures, as presented in Table 3 of the report, and deferring funding for capital projects as listed in Table 6 of the report.

    Council authorized Administration to defer the RCMP Battle Street Detachment Renovations and Improvements Project ($750,000 funded from General Reserve).

    Council directed Administration to defer the replacement of the track at Hillside Stadium ($600,000) to 2021.

    Council also authorized adoption of Revenue Anticipation Borrowing Bylaw No. 16-321, which will allow the City to short-term borrow up to $15 million to protect the City’s cash flow from a possible delay in receiving property tax and utility bill payments due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


  • Financial Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on City of Kamloops Budget

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    4 months ago

    April 8, 2020 - Preliminary Financial Impacts of COVID-19 Pandemic on the City of Kamloops Budget

    With the COVID-19 pandemic and declaration of a provincial state of emergency, the City must review the 2020 provisional budget and the 2020–2024 Five-Year Financial Plan in order to factor in the previously unforeseen financial impacts that the COVID-19 pandemic has on the budget.

    While the ultimate economic impact of the pandemic will not be fully understood until we are well past the state of emergency, the City must consider the preliminary financial picture in order to make strategic decisions today that are in the best interest of the organization and community for the long term.

    At the April 7 Regular Council Meeting, Kathy Humphrey, the City's Corporate Services Director, highlighted the City’s current financial challenges in addressing the impacts of the pandemic, as we plan for the recovery phase of the emergency. To comply with the various orders from public health authorities across the country, the City has closed many of its facilities and reduced service levels.

    Based on the current information, Administration has assessed the potential impact of extending the existing facility closures and service reductions for two scenarios—a three-month period to the end of June 2020 and a six-month period to the end of September 2020. Read the full report.

    In order to address immediate budget shortfalls while ensuring sufficient cash flow to continue with City operations, Administration recommended taking an approach that defers projects to future years, reduces service levels as needed, and supplements additional budget shortfalls with funding from reserves.

    Council directed Administration to bring forward a budget report to the April 21, 2020, Council Meeting that balances the 2020 budget and the 2020–2024 Five-Year Financial Plan by:

    • delaying non-essential supplemental items
    • identifying projects, based on risk, that cannot or should not proceed in 2020 and defer these to a future year
    • adjusting the operating and capital budgets, including service levels, to reduce costs to reflect the impact of COVID-19 on City services and planned projects
    • identifying appropriate reserves to balance the budget after operating and capital adjustments have been made
    • providing options, based on expected provincial direction, for delaying property tax payment deadlines and penalties and providing incentives for early payment
    • providing options for delaying utility payment deadlines and penalties and providing incentives for early payment


  • Supplemental Items Approved and Tax Requirement Set at 2.97%

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    5 months ago

    On Tuesday, February 25, Council met as Committee of the Whole (COTW) to review and decide on the supplemental items to be included in the 2020-2024 Five-Year Financial Plan and to determine the tax requirement for the 2020 budget.


    COTW approved 10 of the 11 proposed supplemental items. Item #9–RCMP Protective Services Training Facility–was deferred to future budget discussions.

    The resulting overall tax rate increase for 2020 will be 2.97% (the provisional tax rate increase, before the consideration of supplemental items, was 2.76%).

    A summary of the supplemental items can be found here in the Document Library.

    Tax rates will be formally approved and set in April.
  • Public Budget Meeting Set For February 20

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    6 months ago

    Every fall, the City begins preparations for updating its annual budget, which is the financial plan for creating and maintaining programs and services for citizens. The public budget meeting in February is a key budget cycle activity.

    At the meeting, the City will update residents on the 2020–2024 Five-Year Financial Plan and the proposed supplemental items along with potential funding sources. The public will have the opportunity to provide feedback on what has been updated or deleted in the provisional budget as well as share ideas and comments on the supplemental budget.

    February 20, 2020, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
    Location: Valley First Lounge, Sandman Centre, 300 Lorne Street
  • 2020 Provisional Budget and Utility Funds Bylaws Adopted

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    8 months ago

    Council has adopted two bylaws related to the 2020 provisional budget (view previous news feed items for a an overview of the provisional budget).

    At its Regular Council Meeting on December 17, Council adopted the 2020-2024 Five-Year Financial Plan Bylaw No. 16-320.

    At its Regular Council Meeting on December 10, Council adopted the Sanitary Sewer Amendment Bylaw No. 32-79.

    The 2020 provisional budget indicates a 2.76% increase in total municipal property taxes, which reflects a $61 increase to the average household. A 7% increase for sewer rates is also required (there are no utility rate increases for water or solid waste and recycling) and will be reflected on utility bills as an average increase of $29 per household.

    Council heard updates on the utility rates and the provisional budget in two Committee of the Whole Meetings on November 19 and November 26, and the bylaws were read a first, second and third time at the December 3 and December 10 Regular Council Meetings.

    The adoption of both bylaws will allow the City to smoothly continue operations and utility billing as it transitions into 2020.

    Budget discussions will continue in the new year, as Council reviews the supplemental items and cost estimates in the provisional budget.

  • November 27 Public Budget Meeting - 2020 Provisional Budget Summary

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    8 months ago

    Dozens of citizens attended the public budget meeting at McArthur Island Sports Centre on November 27, where they had the opportunity to hear from the City's Corporate Services Director, Kathy Humphrey, as she presented the 2020 provisional budget.

    The City's provisional budget for 2020 indicates a 2.76% increase in total municipal taxes, reflecting the need for an additional $3.08 million in tax funding towards the $115 million dollar budget required for 2020. The impact to the average household would be a $61 dollar increase in taxes.

    Humphrey explained that 2020 budget items with significant increased costs include the RCMP contract, staff and firefighter union and wage contacts, the increasing cost of services in general, and the demand for additional services and programs and for social and environmental responsibility.

    You can view the PPT presentation from the meeting here.

    You can ask questions about the budget on our Q&A feature here.

  • November 26 Committee of the Whole Meeting - 2020 Provisional Budget Overview

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    8 months ago

    At the Committee of the Whole (COTW) meeting on Tuesday, November 26, Corporate Services Director Kathy Humphrey provided a summary of the 2020 provisional budget and utility funds, with a view to adopting the 2020–2024 Five-Year Financial Plan Bylaw and the amended Sewer Utilities Bylaw before December 31, 2019.

    Humphrey noted that the provisional budget is based on the requirements to deliver a level of service as approved by Council for 2020, as related to priorities outlined in the Council Strategic Plan. She emphasized that staff are focused on continuing to find efficiencies and innovative ideas to maintain service levels, and that in the face of slow and steady growth in Kamloops, staff are keeping a particular focus on the long term as the City begins to address necessary infrastructure needs and demands for accessible, reliable, and secure technology for both staff operations and the public.

    Humphrey explained that 2020 budget items with significant increased costs include the RCMP contract, staff and firefighter union and wage contacts, the increasing cost of services in general, and the demand for additional services and programs and for social and environmental responsibility.

    Overall, The City's provisional budget indicates a 2.76% increase in total municipal property taxes, which reflects a $61 dollar increase to the average household. A 7% proposed increase for sewer rates (there are no proposed utility rate increases for water or solid waste and recycling), would be reflected on utility bills as an average increase of $29 per household.

    The COTW directed Administration to prepare a bylaw for the 2020–2024 Five-Year Provisional Financial Plan.

  • November 19 Committee Of The Whole Meeting - Budget 2020–2024 Updates

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    9 months ago

    At the Committee of the Whole (COTW) meeting on Tuesday, November 19, City staff presented on updates related to budget 2020 planning. A summary of the presentation is below, and you can watch the webcast of the meeting here.

    Budget Planning Overview
    Kathy Humphrey, the City's Corporate Services Director, provided the COTW with an overview of the key budget dates, the City's financial timeline, and the budget and planning methodology used to develop the City's budget and overall Five-Year Financial Plan.
    View: Infographic: How Does the City Develop its Budget (Key Budget Timeline)

    Humphrey highlighted that the budget is prepared based on a combination of maintaining and repairing existing services and assets, aiming for predictable tax rate projections through long-term planning, and identifying activities that support Council Strategic Plan items.

    Humphrey also pointed out that in addition to collecting property taxes, the City collects taxes for other entities such as the Thompson-Nicola Regional District, the Thompson Regional Hospital District, and School District No. 73, and the City has no control over these other tax rates. The City also has no control over the assessed value of homes (set by BC Assessment), which is the base amount the Council-approved municipal tax rate is applied to.
    View: Infographic: Understanding Your Property Tax Bill and Where Your Taxes Go

    Asset Management Update
    Dave Hallinan, the City's Planning and Procurement Manager, presented an update on the City's Asset Management Program. Hallinan explained that the program began in 2009 along with new formalized accounting practices introduced by the Public Sector Accounting Board. He noted that a strong asset management program provides stewardship of the public assets, helps to effectively allocate financial and human resources, and balances the community's service expectations with its willingness and capacity to pay for the services.

    IT and Digital Strategy Update
    Kuldeep Bath, the City's Information Technology Manager, presented an update on the City's Digital Strategy. Bath shared that an extensive technical assessment review was conducted in 2019 and, as a result, a multi-year roadmap has been developed and an IT Modernization Program has been initiated to manage, design, and implement the roadmap activities.

    Utilities Budget and Rates Update
    Kathy Humphrey presented a summary of the 2020–2024 Five-Year Financial Plan for the utility services. Utility funds consist of funds for water, sewer, and solid waste and recycling. Each fund sets rates to cover its related operating/capital costs. There are no proposed utility rate increases for water or solid waste and recycling for 2020; however, a slight increase is proposed for sewer rates. The COTW authorized staff to prepare a sanitary sewer amendment bylaw to be brought forward in December.

  • Public Budget Meeting Set For November 27

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    9 months ago

    Every fall, the City begins preparations for updating its annual budget, which is the financial plan for creating and maintaining programs and services for citizens. The public budget meeting in November is a key budget cycle activity. At the meeting, the City will inform residents on the 2020–2024 Five-Year Financial Plan and introduce staff and community-driven supplemental items along with potential funding sources. The public will have the opportunity to learn more about the budget process, provide feedback on the provisional budget, and share ideas for future consideration.

    November 27, 2019, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
    Location: Sports Centre Lounge, McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre